MS and B12 deficiency

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MS and B12 deficiency

PA000206
I have a family member who was diagnosed with MS quite a few years ago. Given my recent discovery that I have B12 deficiency, I am wondering if the same is true for my family member and that they were misdiagnosed. Furthermore, I wonder whether starting B12 therapy now would do them any good, assuming that they could be persuaded to find out if they have B12 deficiency. Unfortunately MS, like B12D, robs you of energy and mental functions, and going through the hassle of further tests (especially if it is too late to reverse the damage to the myelin) is not high on their agenda. If there is any evidence that B12 could still help, or any MS sufferers have later found they actually had a B12 problem then it would be interesting to know.
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Re: MS and B12 deficiency

Admin_Mendus
Administrator
You're everywhere! And giving great input.

I've heard of that happening, specifically misdiagnosed as MS.

I would disagree that B12D doesn't rob you of energy and mental function. The symptom overlap is quite large I think. Perhaps B12 wouldn't lead to renewal of the myelin but it may prevent it from getting any worse. And actually, B12 in super high doses, methylcobalamin I believe, has been shown to trigger regrowth in nerve cells. So it isn't even so far of a stretch to think that it could possibly help with myelin renewal.

A quick search on pubmed suggests the connection has already been made!

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=b12+multiple+sclerosis
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Re: MS and B12 deficiency

PA000011
Just adding my two cents worth but research has found that methylcobalamin will repair the myelin sheath.  I think that B12 Deficiency should be ruled out in all MS patients and if an MS patient is found to be low in B12, then SubAcute Combined Degeneration of the Spinal Cord, secondary to pernicious anaemia, should also be ruled out.  This is important because oftentimes MS is diagnosed when lesions are found on the brain.  SACD (caused by advanced PA/B12D) can also cause lesions on the brain and the difference between the two is that lesions caused by MS do not form a pattern, they are scattered. Lesions caused by B12D form a symmetrical pattern.  It takes a radiologist experienced in both MS and B12D to note the difference.
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Re: MS and B12 deficiency

FM000246
In reply to this post by Admin_Mendus
Very interested in this connection.   My sister has MS, very severe now, but was diagnosed at age 25 (she is now 54).  I have B12 anemia (pernicious anemia) and was diagnosed with that at age 25.  I have since also added Fibromyalgia and hypothyroidism to my list of ailments.   I have always wondered if there is a common cause to our ailments, ie we have the same problem but it surfaced in different ways.   My other sister has suffered clinical depression as has my brother.  Perhaps we all have the same root problem that has surfaced in different ways?
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Re: MS and B12 deficiency

Mendus_Admin
Welcome to the group,

I think you hit the nail on the head. I think we're on the verge of a massive revolution in science and medicine. The overlap between many of the mentioned disorders is huge and misdiagnosis apparently very common. Each is also now being explored in relation to the gut, digestion and the micro-biome. If there is a common cause my guess is it lies in the gastro-intestinal tract and likely with those little critters that we couldn't survive without.

If you have any thoughts on how to turn these ideas into a study let me know!

Joshua